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Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Two Ottobre Design tops



Another finished duo! Lately I seem to be making my garments per two, not sure why? Maybe it's a sign that reality is starting to sink in. The combination of a long RTW fast, combined with my slow sewing pace, is now causing serious wardrobe gaps. Using a pattern that's already gone through the fitting process is considerately speeding things up.

This top started out as a Knipmode dress. That didn't work very well, to put it mildly The knit fabric was too clingy and the tiny print didn't do me any favours. It was both a matter of scale and colour. Up close I liked the mix of chocolate brown, turquoise and white. From a distance the overall colour looked rather muted and there were just too many mini daisies all over me in a knee length dress. The dress was out of sight until it resurfaced during a recent sewing room cleaning.




Before tossing the fabric I checked if it would go with any existing garment in my wardrobe. And it did! Dark brown linen trousers, brown Mabel skirt, white jeans and a turquoise RTW cardigan. This fabric could be turned into the missing link for three different outfits. I figured that as a layering piece the clingyness wouldn't bother me so much, extra colour could be added by the cardigan and the daisy overkill would be reduced to an acceptable level. Triple win!




The top is #9 from Ottobre Woman 2/2014. It's the only Ottobre magazine I own, and it was bought for the pattern of the trench coat I made three years ago. I always flip through the pages of new Ottobre issues but haven't bought any in the last four years. Too many hoodies, leggings and t-shirt dresses. The patterns may lack interesting details, the drafting does not! At a closer look this basic looking top came with a few surprises.




The pattern is half lined. The lining ends just above the waist and the bottom is finished with clear elastic. For European sizes 44 and upwards there's a built in cheater FBA. The front bodice is slightly longer between the arrows to provide extra room for the bust. The extra fabric is gathered before sewing the side seams.




And it worked! No drag lines indicating a bigger FBA was needed. I really like the polished look of the neckline and armholes. No bands, no visible stitching.


Inside (back)

I also made this top in white. Instead of the half lining I used a full length lining as I feared the end of the lining would be visible. Now I'm tempted to line all my tops as it feels so luxurious!  With the half lining you still notice the button and belt loops of my jeans poking through, the full lining is more forgiving and smoothing out lumps and bumps.




As you can see I used off white for the lining as I had only just enough fabric for the outer shell. A good way to use up scraps. This top is waiting for warmer weather to be worn sleeveless with a bright floral skirt. But you have already seen me wear it my previous post, together with a Blackwood cardigan.




I can see myself make a few more of these tops. Maybe change the neckline to a square neck, sweetheart or any kind of neckline you won't be able to create with a neckband. I'm not a fan of facings in knit garments but I sure am a fan of lining from now on!

14 comments:

  1. Ooh, i like your tops! Lovely shape and fabrics and super versatile. I also started avoiding facings and i've replaced them with bias binding, but lining is even better because it eliminates the stitching visible from the outside when you want a really clean look like on your white top. Thanks for the idea, I have to remember that.

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    1. Thanks! I find neckbands immediately add a more casual vibe to knit tops. Often not bad at all, but sometimes it's just not what I'm after!

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  2. Great tops. I'm starting to think in pairs and triples too.

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    1. Definitely speeding up the sewing!

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  3. Lovely tops. I like how 'seamless' the neckline finish looks. The white one looks great under your new cardigan. I can see this pattern being useful for mesh knits, where the lining would give a bit of modesty

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  4. Lovely tops, Marianne! They look “substantial” but not at all bulky; in fact, just the opposite - sleek and flattering. The linings are genius.

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    1. Thank you. I think I underestimated Ottobre designs so far!

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  5. really nice tops, the knit lining is a nice feature. A lot of the Vogue designer patterns for knits have a built in lining that results in that clean finish and then I have applied that technique to lots of other items.

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    1. That's good to know! I'm slowly building a collection of Vogue designer patterns and I will certainly include patterns for knits when I can!

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  6. I can see these tops being really useful in a wardrobe - like an elevated t-shirt. I really like the lining / partial lining - a nice clean finish and more substantial than facings.

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    1. Thanks Allison! Elevated t-shirt was the term I was looking for in my limited English vocabulary! Facings for knits can be challenging, glad to have found another option.

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  7. Love the tops! When you lined the white one, does the lining go all the way to the hem? Do you join the lining and outside shell in any way, like along the side seams? Sorry if these are dumb questions, but just wondering if the lining rides up at all during wearing. I'm thinking that I might do the lining trick on simple knit t-shirt dresses, for a little more coverage of lumps and bumps, and am not sure if there's any reason to do it differently than a woven lining. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks, Rebecca! Yes, the lining goes all the way to the hem. In fact I serged lining and outer shell together at the hem before finishing the hem by hand. If you do a half lining you can use clear elastic to prevent it from riding up. For a dress, or when you're not absolutely sure your lining has the same amount of stretch as your fashion fabric, I would finish outer shell and lining separately, just like you do with a woven lining.

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